Goals: What do you want to be when you grow up?

So, here you are, reading this article, thinking I actually can help you. Chances are, I can—but only if you’re willing to really dig deep and start from the beginning...

Some of the easier questions for me to answer have to deal with money. I come from a very pro union background and was even an apprentice with local 212 IBEW out of Cincinnati, Ohio. Shortly thereafter, the ICWU and then to corporate. Honestly, jumping from non-exempt status to exempt was eye opening. We will get to that later….

I knew I didn’t want to wear a hard hat and steel toed boot anymore, so I decided to go back to college. Sure, I had already bought a house, had a couple of cars that were paid for, but I was all out of goals. I realized that I needed to grow; at 27, I already had everything I ever wanted: independence, freedom and self-sufficiency. So, I decided to challenge myself for the next level: college.
Going back to college was an issue that I kicked around for a few years. I had an ex that brainwashed me into believing I was worthless and yadda yadda. I am still enrolled and am continuing my education. Do I have some fancy 4 point something GPA? No. Look, what do you call a doctor that graduates last?

Ease up, folks, it’s not all about grades in college—just pass and get that piece of paper. What you learn for your job is not taught in schools, js.

Speaking of titles and salutations, figure out what title sounds best on you. I think Director of Transportation of the United States of America is a pretty decent title for me, but I’m still growing into it. I was perusing LinkedIn.com trying to figure out what I wanted to do and I stumbled across some profiles that had similar backgrounds to me when they started out: Director, CEO, Operations Officer (sounded fancy). I figured out my desired title, but I didn’t know what the hell it even meant: Analyst. Dig it. Now what? I was used to working in the trenches and looking at the here and now of operations—not 6-12 months ahead of what that plan was. It just goes on and on...

Next, I had to identify if the new position would have better benefits then where I was currently at. In this case, I was pulling a Hail Mary—going from union to non-union exempt. Big leap of faith. In my case, well worth it because I wasn’t hitting that glass ceiling anymore.

Once I identified what I wanted and how I was going to get it, I had to get real with my strengths and weaknesses. I prepped for interviews like you wouldn’t believe. I knew my attention to details stunk, but that my brainstorming skills were under Par. I dove in head first ready to take a chance; in my case, no spouse and no kids, it was any easy decision…

My current pay is what I build my life around as well as pay into a 401K retirement plan, so it was important. Sure, I could be a teacher—but we all know the pay stinks. So, I have to compromise, what do I want to do that pays extremely well? I identified what that was by checking glassdoor.com as well as some other review sites. Did it have the kind of environment I wanted, ect…

Last but not least, I checked out the evolution of the job—remote location accessible. I get a lap top and a phone reimbursement now! It’s not all it’s cracked up to be, but necessary if you want to move in that direction. As of now, my next few jobs will be like this (stationary in a  brick and mortar location), but will give me enough experience to be able to work remote.

We can plan the plan, but we cannot control the outcome. However, luck is when opportunity meets preparation*.

*somebody said this before me, but it’s my mantra

This is part 1 of a 5 part series. Check out the next one here:
Resume/CV: How to Stand Out

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Goals: What do you want to be when you grow up? Goals: What do you want to be when you grow up? Reviewed by Jessica Hillyer on 12:56:00 PM Rating: 5

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